Article 23 of the TFA calls on each WTO member to establish or maintain a “National Committee for Trade Facilitation” bringing together government authorities, customs and businesses. These committees play a central role in supporting the effective implementation of the TFA to maximize benefits for governments, businesses and consumers. Since the Trade Facilitation Agreement was seen as a non-binding document and not as a set of incentives for developed, developing and least developed countries, it had left many developing and least developed countries doubting that the most prosperous countries were fulfilling their aid obligations. Many African nations are wondering how this agreement can benefit them not only for international trade, but also for interregional trade. [7] As a result, many developing countries are still not in a position to fully commit to ratifying this agreement. The industrialized countries have been able to commit themselves to the agreement because they are able to meet its requirements. However, many nations, such as India and China, have committed to only 70-75% of the measures in trade facilitation agreements. [7] Bureaucratic delays and “bureaucracy” represent a burden on traders for cross-border trade in goods. Trade facilitation — the simplification, modernization and harmonization of export and import processes — has therefore become an important issue for the global trading system. Work on the Trade Facilitation Agreement continued after the Singapore Summit. [2] The main objective of these discussions was to gain a first understanding of the scope of the agreement.

Defining a clearly defined role for the WTO has become a priority. The role played by wtOwould began relatively widely. The earliest proposal is that the WTO would be responsible for payments, insurance and other financial requirements in the area of international trade. [2] In the late 1990s, efforts by a number of countries to make WTO rules binding and not encouraged provoked a reaction to limit the scope and focus on certain aspects of the GATT. The two main areas of interest were Articles VIII and X of the GATT. [2] Part of the Agreement includes assistance to developing and least developed countries to update their infrastructure, train customs officers or for other costs related to the implementation of the Agreement. The first discussions on trade facilitation began in the mid-1990s. In 1996, the Singapore Ministerial Conference gave its first directive to the WTO, but under a different conceptual title. [2] The language used in the letter reflected a potential compromise between those who wished to renegotiate the terms of an agreement and those, particularly developing and least developed countries, who had doubts about the success of new negotiations and preferred a much narrower/limited agenda. Many of the doubts about a future new multilateral trade agreement were that they could not be able to make additional commitments, particularly for developing and least developed countries.

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